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Humanities


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 Mr Mohamed Nazri B Hamzah HOD Humanities
 Mr Fausta Tan Subject Head History 
Mr Brian Tan HOD CCE 
Ms T. Parvathy
Senior Teacher 
 Ms Chow Wan LingTeacher 
 Ms Bo YitingTeacher 
 Mr Jeffrey PohTeacher 
 Mrs Nah Jia YunTeacher
Mr Mohamed Hafiz Teacher 
 Mr Muhamad FairozTeacher 
Mdm Suhaila Mohamed Noor Teacher 
Miss Lim Pei Wen Teacher   


Humanities Curriculum

The humanities curriculum encompasses three connected yet distinctive subjects, namely history, geography and social studies. In Yuhua Secondary, we offer the following humanities subjects at the levels indicated.

 

Level of StudyHumanities Subjects offered
Sec 1,2,3,4Social Studies
Sec 1, 2 Normal Academic
Sec 1, 2 Express
Lower Secondary History
Lower Secondary Geography
 Sec 3, 4, 5 Normal AcademicCombined Humanities
(Social Studies / Geography Elective) 
Sec 3, 4 Express Combined Humanities
(Social Studies with either one of the electives below: 
History Elective / Geography Elective / Literature Elective)


·        Social Studies Normal (Technical)


The new SS N(T) Syllabus adopts an issues-based approach, anchored in the use of inquiry by students to explore current societal issues. 

These issues are presented in the curriculum to resonate with the experiences that the SS N(T) students are familiar with, so that they can relate to the content which would be relevant to their lives.

The syllabus is organised around six issues that are selected to represent concerns surrounding the society at both the national and global levels.

 The issues that would be explored at the lower secondary level are

  • Responding to Migration
  • Living in a Multicultural Society and
  • Resolving Conflict and Building Peace 
  • Protecting Our Environment.

 

At the upper secondary level, students would be exploring the issues of

  • Managing Our Financial Resources and
  • Caring for Society

  • Lower Secondary History

History education in Singapore seeks to develop in students an appreciation of past human experiences, critical awareness of the nature of historical knowledge, and the ability to make connections between the past and present.

Through the study of history, students can draw connections between the past and present by understanding how the nature and impact of past developments explain today’s world. Students learn to be more balanced, discerning, empathetic, enquiring, knowledgeable and methodical in making well-reasoned arguments and decisions.

The revised Lower Secondary History syllabuses seek to imbue in our students a sense of national identity by helping them understand the Singapore they live in today. This will require students to first understand the relevance of Singapore’s past in shaping Singapore’s unique position.  It also aims to set the study of Singapore’s history within the context of developments from the 14th century to the 1970s.  By doing so, students will be cognizant of the global forces that shaped Singapore’s development, and in turn, Singapore’s roles and contributions in response to these global forces. 

Through these new syllabuses, history students will understand not just content concepts such as archaeology, history, colonial rule, migration, sense of belonging, independence and sovereignty, but also historical concepts such as chronology, evidence, diversity, historical significance, and change and continuity.  Students also acquire relevant and age-appropriate historical thinking skills. 

Students taking this syllabus will come to understand the opportunities that Singapore provides, as well as the vulnerabilities that Singapore faces as a small nation-state in relation to the region and the world. 

Unit 1 – Tracing Singapore’s Origins – How old is Singapore?

Unit 2 – Life in Colonial Singapore – Was it the same for everyone?

Unit 3 – Towards Independence – Was Singapore an ‘accidental’ union?

Unit 4 – Singapore’s First Decade (1965-1975) – How did life change?

 

·        Lower Secondary Geography

Geography provides students with a particular set of perspectives to make sense of Singapore and the complex and dynamically changing world.  Spatial perspective focuses on describing physical and human phenomena found on earth and interpreting the complex patterns and interactions affecting Earth and its people.  It also provides students with an understanding, identification and sense of place.

The Lower Secondary Geography syllabuses will enable students to acquire a wide range of knowledge and skills to understand and explain physical and human phenomena; and other contemporary environmental and social issues that occur in different places and cultures.  They will be equipped with the skills of gathering and analysing information, and develop an enquiring mind to seek answers to issues affecting our lives and the world we live in.  This is to prepare students for the 21st century.

Three key concepts, Place, Space, Environment and Scale, are explored in the syllabus.   Place refer to parts of the Earth’s surface that are given meaning by people. They can be natural or man-built Environments.  The concept of Space looks at how areas around us are organised, in terms of its purposes, location and distribution. It explains why the Earth’s surface is arranged the way it is. Scale indicates the significance of the issue being studied and it can range from city, country or region.

Using such key concepts, students gain the knowledge, understanding and skills to understand contemporary people and environmental issues like

  • Tropical rainforest: How can we save the rainforest?
  • Water Supply: Will our taps run dry?
  • Energy resources: How can we avoid an energy crisis?
  • Housing: How to build inclusive homes for all?
  • Transport: How can we keep people moving?
  • Floods: How can cities prepare for floods?

  

·        Combined Humanities

Combined Humanities is a compulsory subject offered at the ‘N’ and ‘O’ levels. The subject comprises two components, a compulsory and an elective component. Social Studies is the compulsory component while students can choose electives from History, Geography and Literature.

 Social Studies

 The syllabus is organised around two core ideas – “Being Rooted” and “Living Global”. Through these two ideas, the syllabus aims to develop our students into well-informed, responsible citizens with a sense of national identity and a global perspective. The twin core ideas are delivered through six themes reflecting the topics from disciplines such as History, Geography, Political Science, Sociology and Economics.

The compulsory case study syllabus is based on the following three themes. Students will learn about:

  • Understanding Governance
  • Conflict and Harmony in Multi-Ethnic Societies
  • Managing International Relations 

In addition, students will learn:

  • Sustaining economic development
  • Facing challenges and change

 

History Elective

History education in Singapore seeks to develop in students an appreciation of past human experiences, critical awareness of the nature of historical knowledge, and the ability to make connections between the past and present.

Through the study of history, students can draw connections between the past and present by understanding how the nature and impact of past developments explain today’s world. Students learn to be more balanced, discerning, empathetic, enquiring, knowledgeable and methodical in making well-reasoned arguments and decisions.

History elective focuses on “The Making of the Contemporary World Order (1900s–1991)”

To be effective citizens and participants in the 21st century, students need to understand how the present world system came into being, and the inter-connectedness of nation-states and peoples. The revised history elective syllabus seeks to examine the key forces and developments which have shaped international history in the 20th century. Through this revised syllabus, history students will acquire not just conceptual tools such as balance of power, hegemony, geopolitics and nationalism, but also the historical thinking skills


Unit 1 starts with the narrative of Europe in crisis. It examines how, in the first half of the 20th century, European rivalries erupted into two world wars and the rise of authoritarianism that challenged the governments in Europe and led to the collapse of European hegemony.

Unit 2 analyses the shift in the global balance of power from Europe to the USA and USSR at the end of WWII. This re-alignment led to the emergence of a bi-polar world dominated by ideological, geopolitical and economic competition between the two superpowers. The end of the Cold War in 1991 concludes the most recent phase of great power politics and competition.

The use of enquiry question in each unit provides the focal point for students to investigate, extract, order, collate, synthesise and analyse information to formulate and test a hypothesis and reach a conclusion on issues explored in the syllabuses.

 

Note: The Normal (Academic) syllabus covers similar themes but at lesser depth for some topics. 

 

Geography Elective

Geography provides students with a particular set of perspectives to make sense of Singapore and the complex and dynamically changing world.  Spatial perspective focuses on describing physical and human phenomena found on earth and interpreting the complex patterns and interactions affecting Earth and its people.  It also provides students with an understanding, identification and sense of place.

Geography focuses on physical and human aspects of the subject and the linkages that exist between them by presenting them in the form of geographical questions. It gives students a deeper and critical understanding of the changing world and helps prepare them for the complexities in the 21st century.

This syllabus adopts an inquiry-based approach to the learning of Geography. There are four topics in themes 1 and 2 of the O-Level Geography Elective syllabus. Each of these topics is presented in the form of an overarching geographical question. Each topic is organised around either two or three key questions and these key questions serve as the organisational framework of the syllabus. For each key question, there are learning outcomes, content and main terms.

In physical geography, students will learn about earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis, and the different weather and climate. In human geography, students learn for instance about the tourism sector and its growth, and what influences food demand and supply. Students will also develop skills and techniques to interpret and evaluate geographical data. They will also be asked to construct or complete graphs, diagrams, tables, field sketches, cross-sections and transects.

The O-Level Geography Elective syllabus is structured around three major themes, namely “Our Dynamic Planet”, “Our Changing World” and “Geographical Skills and Investigations”. Each theme in physical and human geography comprises two topics as shown below.

Theme 1: Our Dynamic Planet (Physical Geography)

(1) Living with Tectonic Hazards - Risk or opportunity?

(2) Variable Weather and Changing Climate – A continuing challenge?

Theme 2: Our Changing World (Human Geography)

(3) Global Tourism - Is tourism the way to go?

(4) Food Resources – Is technology a panacea for food shortage?

Theme 3: Geographical Skills and Investigations

(5) Topographical Map Reading Skills

(6) Geographical Data and Techniques

(7) Geographical Investigations

 

Note: The Normal (Academic) syllabus covers similar themes but at lesser depth for some topics.  

 

Literature Elective

 

  • Geography

Geography focuses on physical and human aspects of the subject and the linkages that exist between them by presenting them in the form of geographical questions. It gives students a deeper and critical understanding of the changing world and helps prepare them for the complexities in the 21st century.

 This syllabus adopts an inquiry-based approach to the learning of Geography. There are six topics in themes 1 and 2 of the O-Level Geography Elective syllabus. Each of these topics is presented in the form of an overarching geographical question. Each topic is organised around three key questions and these key questions serve as the organisational framework of the syllabus. For each key question, there are learning outcomes, content and main terms.

 In physical geography, students will learn about coastal features and processes, earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis, and the different weather and climate. In human geography, students learn for instance about the tourism sector and its growth, what influences food demand and supply and what influences the spread of infectious diseases. Students will also develop skills and techniques to interpret and evaluate geographical data. They will also be asked to construct or complete graphs, diagrams, tables, field sketches, cross-sections and transects.

 The O Level Geography syllabus is structured around three major themes, namely “Our Dynamic Planet”, “Our Changing World” and “Geographical Skills and Investigations”. Each theme comprises three topics as shown below:

 Theme 1: Our Dynamic Planet (Physical Geography)

(1) Coasts – Should coastal environments matter?

(2) Living with Tectonic Hazards – Risk or opportunity?

(3) Variable Weather and Changing Climate – A continuing challenge?

 Theme 2: Our Changing World (Human Geography)

(4) Global Tourism – Is tourism the way to go?

(5) Food Resources – Is technology a panacea for food shortage?

(6) Health and Diseases – Are we more vulnerable than before?

 Theme 3: Geographical Skills and Investigations

(7) Topographical Map Reading Skills

(8) Geographical Data and Techniques

(9) Geographical Investigations